When This Tree Sheds It’s Skin The Most BEAUTIFUL Thing Happens Underneath

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Nature will never lose its ability to surprise us with its beauty. While there are new and remarkable discoveries made each year, there are some known species that still amaze us each time we see them. One such species is Eucalyptus deglupta, better known as the “rainbow eucalyptus.” It’s tall, triumphant, and gorgeous to look at…

But why does this beautiful tree have multi-colored bark?

The short answer is that it sheds.

The rainbow eucalyptus sheds its outer bark every year, but it does so in random chunks and at different times. The tree’s outer layer remains smooth while various strips of bark fall off every month. Whenever a piece of bark falls off, the missing patches reveal the greener inner-bark of the tree.

As time passes, this green bark grows darker, changing into different shades of blue, grey, red, and even luscious maroon. And because it’s constantly shedding different strips of bark at different times, the tree becomes covered in multi-colored stripes, giving it the “rainbow” in its namesake! But these trees are more than just pretty to look at…



BUT WAIT…. THERE’S MORE!

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“Trunk at Keanae Arboretum, Maui, Hawaii.” / Via Forest and Kim Starr

“Bark at Hana Hwy, Maui, Hawaii.” / Via Forest and Kim Starr

Facts about the rainbow eucalyptus

The rainbow eucalyptus is a remarkably fast-growing tree. According to accounts in Hawaii, these trees can grow up to 6 feet per year and can stand a total of over 200 feet tall! Due to their rapid growth-rate, the rainbow eucalyptus is considered to be an invasive species in many parts of the world (specifically the U.S.).

Before you try to grow one of these wonderful trees on your own, make sure you verify that they’re legal to grow in your part of the world.

More than just pretty to look at, they’ve also been cultivated for many reasons. They’ve been planted to help stop erosion, harvested for pulp in the paper industry, and they’ve even been used as fuel for wood fires in the sugar cane industry. So where can I find a place to visit this unique eucalyptus?

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“Rainbow eucalyptus tree at Miami MetroZoo, Florida” / Via Lisa Jacobs

Where to find a rainbow eucalyptus

Eucalyptus deglupta are native to the Philippines, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. But that doesn’t mean you need a passport to visit them!

The tree is very adaptable and grows in many other parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Rainbow eucalyptus proudly grow in Hawaii’s Hana rainforest in Maui, where visitors are encouraged to visit these wonderful trees. They also grow in the southern parts of California, Texas, and Florida, although they don’t reach the same heights as they do in their natural habitats.


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Will Stefanski is a left-handed bibliophile who now owns a cherry-red Schwinn Traveler III. On summer afternoons you can almost see his vermilion shadow passing you at great speeds.