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Watch This Rain Bomb Absolutely Soak A City In Arizona

Nature is full of awe-inspiring creatures and phenomena, but few are more spectacular than a rain bomb, a tiny storm of pounding rain and thrashing wind that seems to come out of nowhere.

A wet microburst, also known as a rain bomb, takes place when air cools quickly, becomes more dense, and plunges toward the Earth at a rate of about 60 miles per hour, bringing heavy rains along with it. When this burst of air can no longer go down, it begins moving outward instead, causing winds of 150 miles per hour or more. Not to mention splashing water all over the place. If you don’t like being wet, this isn’t the weather for you!

There are dry microbursts as well that lack precipitation, but a dry microburst will never compare to the pure scientific beauty of a wet microburst, like the one captured in this rare time-lapse video.

Love watching science in action? Check out the spectacular thing that photobombs this time-lapse video of the night sky! And if you just can’t get enough of those time-lapse videos, here’s another.

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Elizabeth Nelson is a wordsmith, an alumna of Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, a four-leaf-clover finder, and a grammar connoisseur. She has lived in west Michigan since age four but loves to travel to new (and old) places. In her free time, she. . . wait, what’s free time?